Project Conservation

Support Tiger Research and Conservation

Make a gift to Project Conservation. Your donation, big or small, supports the University of Minnesota CLAWS lab, focusing on Asiatic Wildlife. Our current projects are dedicated to conserving tigers in Thailand and Nepal. Our work is made possible through donations. Thank you.

 
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Our Mission

OUR MISSION IS TO CONSERVE THE WORLD’S ECOSYSTEMS AND WILDLIFE. BY SUPPORTING ONGOING CONSERVATION RESEARCH AND LOCAL COMMUNITIES THAT RELY ON THE ECOSYSTEMS, WE ENSURE A FUTURE FOR BOTH PEOPLE AND WILDLIFE. THROUGH THE PRODUCTION OF SCIENTIFIC MEDIA PUBLICATIONS, WE SPREAD PUBLIC AWARENESS AND PROMOTE ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION WORLDWIDE.

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Our Partners

We partner with the CLAWS lab at the University of Minnesota, wildlife biologists, nonprofits and communities worldwide to support and build capacity for conservation on a local level.

 

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Our Impact

In its first campaign, Project Conservation successfully raised over $10K to rebuild an ecologically important village in Nepal following the devastating 2015 earthquake. This past summer Project Conservation started filming our first film project The Last Tiger, which documents the difficulties of tiger conservation in a growing human-dominated landscape. PC is partnered with Nepal’s National Trust for Nature Conservation and Nepal Tiger Trust and aims to donate a large portion of proceeds from The Last Tiger to these organizations to support human-tiger conflict mitigation efforts.

 

 

3+

Years supporting conservation

We have supported conservation work in both Nepal and Thailand by providing funds and media publications. 

 

 

10+

Thousand Dollars Raised

We raised over 10k to help rebuild a small village of 200 people in the remote Himalayan mountains, after the 2015 Gorkha earthquake hit Nepal. 

 
 

100%

of donations go to our projects

Every dollar donated goes directly to our projects. 

 
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Our Projects

Project Conservation is currently focused on tiger conservation in Chitwan National Park, Nepal and the Western Forest Complex in Thailand. Today, Chitwan National Park (CNP) is one of the only places in the world where more tigers exist today than 30 years ago. However, an unforeseen consequence of tiger expansion is an exponential increase in the number of humans killed by tigers around CNP. Human-tiger conflict is one of the most urgent issues related to tiger conservation.  In Thailand, biological and ecological studies are ongoing, and with their dedication to tiger conservation, Thailand is the only place in SE Asia where tiger populations are returning. 

 
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“Long-term conservation of tigers and other large wildlife species in Asia will depend on careful land-use planning and zoning of large conservation landscapes to include areas for human use, core habitat, wildlife corridors, and buffer zones. Enlisting the support and cooperation of local people by providing greater economic incentives and opportunities for political empowerment, and by in-voking cultural values that favor attachments to wildlife, will be imperative."

Dinerstein et al., 2007